Rachel Dolezal 2.0! Activist Reveals She's Been POSING As A Black Woman!

Just when we thought 2020 couldn’t get any worse, the new Rachel Dolezal has come forward!

Jessica A. Krug (above) — a history professor at George Washington University whose areas of expertise include African American history, Africa, and Latin America — admitted in a blog post that she’s been posing as a Black woman for the larger part of her adult life, and is actually a white Jewish woman from Kansas.

In a shocking post on Medium, the instructor said she deceived friends and colleagues for years by falsely claiming several identities, including “North African Blackness, then US rooted Blackness, then Caribbean rooted Bronx Blackness,” writing:

“I am not a culture vulture. I am a culture leech. I have thought about ending these lies many times over many years, but my cowardice was always more powerful than my ethics… I have built my life on a violent anti-Black lie, and I have lied in every breath I have taken.”

Krug went on to say she’s been struggling with “unaddressed mental health demons” for her entire life, and that she started to assume a false identity as a child.

But as she explained in her post, her mental health issues “can never, will never, neither explain nor justify, neither condone nor excuse, that, in spite of knowing and regularly critiquing any and every non-Black person who appropriates from Black people, my false identity was crafted entirely from the fabric of Black lives.”

Because, like Dolezal, the OG Black imposter, Krug used her faux-Blackness to create quite the career for herself: she’s taught history courses at GWU since 2012, including classes about Africa diaspora and African history.

She’s also had work published on the subjects of Blackness, in which she posed as a woman of color. In an essay published on Essence, Krug called herself a “boricua,” a term used to describe Puerto Ricans who live in the US. She also described herself as “an unrepentant and unreformed child of the hood” on her website, despite growing up in suburban Kansas City.

After her book, Fugitive Modernities, earned her finalist spots for awards named after Harriet Tubman and Frederick Douglass, Krug became part of a network of Black academics. Unsurprisingly, those scholars quickly severed ties with the poser after her admission went viral.

Hari Ziyad, a Black author, screenwriter, and editor-in-chief of the online publication RaceBaitr, called Krug “a friend up until this morning” in a series of tweets, writing:

“For years I defended her work, and her from her own self-loathing. I always knew there was something off. It was in her persistent negativity and jealousy, her always needing to prove her authenticity at the expense of everything else.”

Needless to say, Twitter is dragging Krug — who said in her post that she was “canceling” herself over her actions. Users fumed:

So sick!

How many more people like this are out there!??

Read her full essay HERE if you can stomach it.

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