These are the most popular interior design trends this autumn

Bold wallpaper in the loo, art deco and going for gold: Five interior design trends surging in popularity this autumn

  • Searches have risen for interior design features such as wallpaper in the loo 
  • Expert says you should be bold and adventurous with your prints
  • Cole & Son is a popular choice among interior designers due to its quirky paper

Wallpaper in the loo? It’s where you can be bold and adventurous with your prints

Five of this autumn’s most popular interior design trends have been revealed, including the use of wallpaper in the loo, cosy living room carpets and elements of gold inspired by the art deco era.

The trends have been outlined by Houzz, a home renovation website that links professionals with tradespeople.

It says searches on its website had increased up to 77 per cent for some items, compared to spring and summer.

1. Loo wallpaper

The website suggested searches for wallpaper for use on loo walls has increased 72 per cent between the two time periods analysed. 

Top 100 interior designers Alexander James recommend being bold with your wallpaper choices.

Stacey Sibley, head designer at Alexander James, said: ‘Cloakrooms are where people tend to be adventurous with their colours and patterns. Cole & Son is popular as it has very quirky iconic paper.

‘Either people go dark with the trend for dark painted skirting boards and doors, and then a bold patterned wallpaper such as large banana leaves, or very bright colours and bold patterns. 

‘Linwood’s tango collection has lots of fun bold prints.’

She added: ‘If it’s a bathroom where you know you will be splashing lots of water around, I would use a vinyl paper its more durable.’ 

Searches for carpets are up 77 per cent since the Spring, according to Houzz. 

It said carpets in living rooms are particularly popular with the search term ‘living room’ rising 90 per cent since March.

‘It seems we’re most focused on making our living spaces cosy,’ explained Houzz’s Victoria Harrison. 

However, Stacey suggested that wooden floors do not need to feel cold.

‘It depends on what type of wood colour you use and the finish,’ she said. ‘If you use a warm colour wood that has a lot of texture, then this doesn’t feel cold. 

‘Also it depends on how you lay them as it’s very fashionable to have a herringbone pattern laid, which can add depth and colour.’

A cosy touch: Searches for carpets are up 77 per cent since the Spring

She also suggested adding a rug on wooden floors as they can zone an area and make it feel warmer. 

However, if you do decide to opt for a carpet, she recommended soft greys, taupes, stones and mushrooms as popular colours, especially ones with a bit of texture and a softer pile. 

Yellow creams and peach tones have ‘definitely gone out of fashion’, she added.

3. Panelling 

Two other popular trends are the use of panelling and books to bring interest and colour to living spaces.

Houzz said searches for panelling increased 63 per cent since March, with the trend tapping into the desire for a rich and warm interior during the colder months. 

4. Books 

Searches for bookshelves increased 55 per cent as people seek to curl up on sofa and read a book during the colder months.  

Ms Sibley recommended fitted bookcases as a great space saving storage option as the cupboards allow you to hide things away.

She said painted bookcases are currently on trend, especially dark painted ones in a Farrow & Ball paint colour such as down pipe, railings or hague blue. 

Painted bookcases are currently on trend, especially dark painted ones 

5. Art Deco 

And finally, Houzz said searches for Art Deco have jumped 72 per cent since March. 

Signature elements of this trend include rich lacquered furniture, glinting mirrors and strong colours. 

Pictured: The Art Deco theme is reflected here in the rick colours, accents of gold and geometric shates

  • The photographs supplied by Houzz were taken by several photographers, including Kristin Laing, Rachel Loewen, and Mia Mortensen






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