Woman,38, claiming it's 'unfair' she can't receive IVF on NHS

Woman, 38, breaks down on This Morning over ‘unfair’ IVF postcode lottery on the NHS after being turned down because of her age and partner’s previous children

  • Steph,38, and Tom,40, appeared on This Morning to speak about fertility issues 
  • Say they weren’t allowed to get IVF on NHS due to Buckingham CCG restrictions 
  • Claimed a women older then her in a different area was entitled to three rounds 
  • Told it was ‘unfair’ and broke down as expert Dr Larisa Corda spoke of problem

A woman broke down in tears on This Morning claiming that the NHS postcode lottery for IVF is unfair, after she was turned down for treatment.  

Steph, 38, from Buckinghamshire, appeared on the show with her partner Tom, 40, and fertility expert Dr Larisa Corda where she spoke of her struggle to conceive, and told that different restrictions on free IVF are ‘unfair’. 

She explained that she’d been turned down because of her age and the fact that her partner has two teenage children from a previous relationship. 

However, she claimed that an older friend, whose partner also has children, was given three free rounds of IVF on the NHS because she lives in London.  

Steph who has polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) and was forced to have one of her fallopian tubes removed while another is damaged, was also left devastated by an ectopic pregnancy, and was unable to hold in her tears as Dr Corda spoke about her problems. 

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Steph (picture right, middle) , 38, from Buckinghamshire broke down in tears on This Morning today after claiming that she was unable to receive IVF on the NHS, when an older friend was entitled to three rounds

She appeared on the show with her partner Tom, 40, (pictured) where she spoke of her struggle to conceive, and told that different restrictions on free IVF are ‘unfair’

Admitting that she knew getting pregnant would be an arduous process because of her health conditions, she said: ‘I knew it was going to be an issue.’ 

‘As soon as I met Tom, I said straight away, “If we try and have children, I know it will be a long process, it will be hard”. 

After immediately seeking advice on the best way to get pregnant, Steph and Tom were heartbroken to discover their local clinical commissioning group didn’t allow IVF for women over 35 or those whose partners already have children.  

She said: ‘It’s very unfair. I have a friend who had treatment in East London who was in a similar situation to me, older children, her other half already had children and she was entitled to three rounds.’ 

Steph explained that the couple can’t move to a different area to seek IVF because they need to be near Tom’s children from a previous relationship 

 When quizzed by host Phillip Schofield (far left)  whether she had considered moving into a different area, she said: ‘Do you put your life on hold to try and have children?’ 

When quizzed by host Phillip Schofield whether she had considered moving to a different area, she said: ‘Do you put your life on hold to try and have children? 

‘We both work out west, Tom’s children are out west, you can’t make that drastic change to have a baby. 

‘It will be the most expensive thing you’ll have in your life. You can’t ruin your living situation prior to that. It doesn’t make sense.’ 

The couple then explained that in another bid to become pregnant, Steph attempted egg sharing, which meant donating her eggs in exchange for free rounds of IVF treatment. 

The couple then explained that in another bid to become pregnant, Steph attempted egg sharing, however was left with an ectopic pregnancy 

Dr Corda then spoke of rules and regulations around fertility problems, and suggested that fertility problems should be treated as a disease, causing Steph to well up

Steph’s eggs meant two other couples had successful pregnancies, but her IVF treatment was not successful.

One round failed and the other turned out to be an ectopic pregnancy where the egg implants outside of the womb, usually in one of the fallopian tubes. 

Tom said: ‘That was very bittersweet. We got pregnant, but had to have it removed because it went ectopic.’ 

Dr Corda then spoke of rules and regulations around fertility treatment, and suggested that problems with conceiving should be treated as a disease, causing Steph to well up. 

Steph said: ‘There are a lot of women out there who are settling down later in life and so to have this age cut off is ridiculous.’ 

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